Gin-For’s Odditiques

Stylistic and historical development The formative period to c. The dating for prehistoric culture in China is still very uncertain, but this material is probably at least 7, or 8, years old. The art of the Neolithic Period represents a considerable advance. The Yangshao Painted Pottery culture, named after the first Neolithic site discovered in , had its centre around the eastern bend of the Huang He Yellow River , and it is now known to have extended across northern China and up into Gansu province. Yangshao pottery consists chiefly of full-bodied funerary storage jars made by the coiling, or ring , method. They are decorated, generally on the upper half only, with a rich variety of geometric designs, whorls, volutes, and sawtooth patterns executed in black and red pigment with sweeping, rhythmic brushwork that foreshadows the free brush painting of historical periods. Some of the pottery from the village site of Banpo c.

Japanese Porcelain Marks

Whether you collect antique Chinese pottery vases, eighteenth century British sterling silver or any type of antique at all, you know the understanding of antique identification marks is invaluable. Thousands of Antique Identification Marks When thinking of all antiques in existence there are tens of thousands, if not more, of different identification marks.

For instance one website, Antique-Marks, has more than 10, images of maker’s marks and trademarks found on antique pottery and porcelain. Every collector, whether a novice or seasoned, needs accurate resources that help to identify and value pieces of interest. The same is true for antique dealers, auctioneers and pickers.

With the vast number of identification marks, it is virtually impossible to recognize all of the different manufacturers of one specific category, such as English porcelain.

Jasperware, or jasper ware, is a type of pottery first developed by Josiah Wedgwood in the s. Usually described as stoneware, it has an unglazed matt “biscuit” finish and is produced in a number of different colours, of which the most common and best known is a pale blue that has become known as Wedgwood Blue. Relief decorations in contrasting colours (typically in white but also in other.

Jasperware composition and colours[ edit ] Black jasper copy of the Portland Vase by Wedgwood. Named after the mineral jasper for marketing reasons, the exact Wedgwood formula remains confidential, but analyses indicate that barium sulphate is a key ingredient. He had been researching a white stoneware for some time, creating a body called “waxen white jasper” by This tended to fail in firing, and was not as attractive as the final jasperware, and little was sold.

Barium sulphate “cawk” or “heavy-spar” was a fluxing agent and obtainable as a by-product of lead mining in nearby Derbyshire. The yellow is rare. A few pieces, mostly the larger ones like vases, use several colours together, [13] and some pieces mix jasperware and other types together. The earliest jasper was stained throughout, which is known as “solid,” but before long most items were coloured only on the surface; these are known as “dipped” or “dip”.

Dipping was first used in , Wedgwood writing that “the Cobalt 36s. Solid jasper was not manufactured again until In the best early pieces the relief work was gone over, including some undercutting, by lapidaries. Mid th century sage-green bottle vase. Dark blue teapot, s White ground with sage-green reliefs, “Red” jasperware beaker, c.

White ground, lilac and green reliefs, c.

Lladro Marks & Trademarks Reference Guide – Date and Authenticate Your Lladro Figurine

As a leader in the unfolding intellectual, social, political, and economic revolutions of eighteenth and nineteenth century Europe, Britain had a long history of extending formal protection to ideas and products. A textbook example of early industrial capitalism was the nineteenth century British pottery industry. While the early focus of protection was on technique and product, after , English potters could also register their designs or patterns with the Patent Office and then impress or print the registry designation upon a vessel.

Doing so likely served at least two functions. First, it provided the producer with some design protection even though English potters were notorious in their “adaptations” of the patterns of others. Secondly, it served as a positive marketing device to the extent that consumers viewed English pottery as a superior product.

Van Briggle actual marking of years was basically nonexistent after Fire, flood, and several different owners all contributed to the myriad of bottom markings, leaving no consistency to identification of Van Briggle pottery.

To withstand the stresses of firing, a large pottery sculpture must be hollow and of an even thickness. There are two main ways of achieving this. Firing also protects the clay body against the effects of water. This forms a nonporous opaque body known as stoneware. In this section, earthenware is used to denote all pottery substances that are not vitrified and are therefore slightly porous and coarser than vitrified materials. The line of demarcation between the two classes of vitrified materials—stoneware and porcelain—is extremely vague.

In the Western world, porcelain is usually defined as a translucent substance—when held to the light most porcelain does have this property—and stoneware is regarded as partially vitrified material that is not translucent. The Chinese, on the other hand, define porcelain as any ceramic material that will give a ringing tone when tapped. None of these definitions is completely satisfactory; for instance, some thinly potted stonewares are slightly translucent if they have been fired at a high temperature, whereas some heavily potted porcelains are opaque.

Therefore, the application of the terms is often a matter of personal preference and should be regarded as descriptive, not definitive. Kinds of pottery Earthenware Earthenware was the first kind of pottery made, dating back about 9, years. In the 21st century, it is still widely used. The earthenware body varies in colour from buff to dark red and from gray to black.

The body can be covered or decorated with slip a mixture of clay and water in a creamlike consistency, used for adhesive and casting as well as for decoration , with a clear glaze, or with an opaque tin glaze.

Antique Identification Marks

HB-Henriot and other factories But the same links are also at the bottom of the page and I hope you’ll first take the time to read these tips: Regular readers of www. To avoid confusing the existing customers of both enterprises, separate work areas and production lines were established and maintained.

Most Zsolnay is marked with an series of numbers (usually 3 or 4) which related to a form book design. That number is a chronological number relating to a production date.

Your guide to antique pottery marks, porcelain marks and china marks Moorcroft Marks A Guide to Moorcroft Marks and identifying dates for Moorcroft Pottery. The moorcroft pottery has mainly remained in the hands of one family since its creation and Moorcroft mark changes have been quite few. The Moorcroft marks remained steady until the modern owners instigated a system of dating and then again until modern Moorcroft design studio artists, where allowed to mark the Moorcroft pottery they personally designed or created.

Modern Moorcroft marks continue to become more elaborate and to provide more and more information. Moorcroft collectors should be aware of the Silver Stripe that sometimes appears and is almost always through the WM monogram. The Moorcroft silver stripe denotes a second quality or imperfect piece that has failed to pass the strict quality control that Moorcroft demands.

Wedgwood Marks

Fortunately, there are still many original Beswick figurines out there that could be purchased by the avid collector. Collectors of porcelain figurines will be familiar with the wide range of stamps used by manufacturers to mark their work. John Beswick implemented this practice at his Beswick factory and the range of marks or stamps that can be found on Beswick pieces give an invaluable insight into both your provenance and value in the piece itself.

The answer to this is certainly no. There are a large number of Beswick figurines in circulation that should not have a mark at all along with the Beswick factory was well-known for unfinished pieces, particularly on a Friday afternoon!

This page shows typical marks from Plateelbakkerij Zuid-Holland (PZH). PZH was founded in the town of Gouda in South-Holland (Zuid-Holland).

Why not pay a visit? We are located on the top floor near the desk. Collecting Collecting There has been such a wide variety of Poole designs over the years that almost anyone can find something that appeals to them, whether you have previously been interested in pottery or not. You may choose to collect small vases, large vases, plates, jugs, bowls, lamps, animal figures or even tableware.

Whatever your preference Poole is easy to start collecting as there is always a range of attractive, but relatively inexpensive, items available from all the main categories. As you progress you can start to hunt down those rarer and more obscure pieces, and begin to pay a bit more for the showpiece items in your collection. Reading Marks Poole Pottery is nearly always marked on the base; it is very rare to find an unmarked piece. Understanding what the marks mean is the key to identifying and dating Poole Pottery.

Reading the marks is quite easy, but you will need a reference book to decode them fully Poole Pottery by Hayward and Atterbury is the standard text. Here are some examples. Backstamps The backstamp is either an incised mark, that may read “Carter Stabler Adams”, “Poole, England” or similar, or a printed mark reading “Poole, England” with a dolphin figure. There may also be a range name “Aegean”.

Moorcroft Marks

Beside the factory stamp, the other marks to look out for are the pattern code, usually two letters but sometimes one or three ; the shape number , either inscribed, impressed or printed; and the decorators mark , sometimes initials but just as often a symbol. For example, the three pots below can be identified from their bases as WK pattern, shape number is unclear but its , painted by Winifred Rose , V pattern, shape , with decorator o Myrtle Bond , and E for elaborate CS pattern, shape , painted by A Betty Gooby.

Poole Pottery can be dated by looking both at the factory mark at the base, as this changed over time, as well as looking at the monogram used by the individual decorator, for whom there are records of when they worked at the factory. Before looking at either of these however there are other clues that can be used to date Poole Pottery.

Sten has spent more than forty years in Southeast Asia designing and engineering various marine structures. His interest in Asia’s pottery and porcelain eventually lead to his search and excavation of numbers of ancient shipwrecks.

If you are trying to find the meaning of elusive pottery marks or need to research famous potters we have a large selection of both and are adding to the site all the time. There are some useful guides about how to look after your collection, and even start your collection. Please feel free to bookmark the site and browse at your convenience. Collecting Pottery Sylvac cat People have admired fine china pottery for centuries, but collecting ordinary domestic pottery and local wares is a more recent interest.

Pottery by fashionable makers and designers is expensive, especially in antique shops and specialised sales, but it is still possible to build an interesting collection of modern ceramics without breaking the bank. Starting a pottery collection Keep your eyes open. You need great enthusiasm and a willingness to hunt for interesting pottery everywhere you go. Look out for antique fairs, general auctions, house clearance sales, junk shops and car boot sales — anywhere that might have china and pottery for sale.

Have you looked in your own attic. After years of the Antiques Roadshow, there are not many genuine Ming vases just waiting to be picked up for a song, but some copies have become collectable and valuable in their own right.

Chinese pottery

If your number is higher, but less than the number for the next year, then your item had it’s design registered during that year. In July the numbering sequence changed as indicated on the chart. The last number issued in July was and began again In August starting with number To give an example using the number above the chart, Rd means: Design of your item was registered during The Public Record office and the British Government tend to enforce these marks and registration numbers.

Van Briggle Artist Markings There are three basic classes of artisans at Van Briggle, and they each have distinctive marks that may appear on the bottom of Van Briggle Pottery.

The method of signing pieces did change over the years. This page is designed to be a basic guide to help you identify the actual date of your piece of Van Briggle. Differences in script, clay color, bottom residue, finishers numbers, glazers marks and artist initials can all help in the dating of a piece of Van Briggle pottery. The earliest pieces of Van Briggle will often have the AA logo, company name, roman numerals and a date and stamped shape number in most cases.

Sometimes these bottom marks are glaze obscured or partially ground off of the bottom. Often times the bottom of the piece is also completely glazed but not always. The era pieces will often times have the company name and logo along with finishers numbers on each side of the AA logo and a 3 digit shape number on the base. Sometimes there is a white wash on the bottom of these pieces. Often time the bottom is heavily ground on pieces from this era.

Many pieces were dated in the teens era from scarce , , , to The pieces are also somewhat scarce.

Antiques marks & appraisal – 260


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